2005-12-31

Leftist countries grow more in Latin America

According to a report from the Economic Comission for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC), countries governed by leftist parties had higher economic growth in Latin America in 2005. In recent years (Cuba being the exception), many countries have elected presidents from leftist parties (Venezuela, Argentina, Chile, Uruguay, Brazil, and now Bolivia... the list keeps growing). Why? Well, rightwing governments seem to be less aware of the social problems that are common to all Latin American countries. At least they don't do much to solve the problems. A big one is the debt, that some of the mentioned countries have been paying in advance. Another is unemployment. (If you solve these, activating the economy, there is no need for people to immigrate). Hopefully, it seems that Mexico will join the list of leftist countries next year...

Now, I wouldn't say that socialist development programmes are the best for all countries in the world. Some really need dictatorships (otherwise there's only civil war and chaos), others do well with neoliberal models. But not Latin America. It is time for socialism (again!). During the Cold War, there were several democratically elected socialist governments (Guatemala, Chile, Nicaragua...) that were then militarly fought with support form the USA, as a part of the Dirty War. Well, anything that could have a tint of communism in those days, should be stepped upon. I understand that the USA didn't want more Soviet camps in Latin America, and that it was a war after all. But please! The socialism in Chile of Allende was much more similar to that of today's Sweden or Belgium. Allende himself was against many Soviet ideals...

In any case, socialist governements in Latin America also failed because they did not have as much support as they have now in the population. The ideological war is over. Indeed, it's the economy, stupid! And if now socialist models perform better in Latin America, this is good even for USA. Nobody is benefited by a weak Latin American market...

Read more (in Spanish) at www.jornada.unam.mx/200...


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